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Nanouk Leopold en Robert Icke new directors, a new social series and the grand finale of Roman tragedies in Carré.

What determines your identity? Where is your home? Where do you feel at home? Together with the ensemble, directors from the Netherlands, Great Britain, Australia and Belgium will be examining these urgent questions during the new season.



We will be welcoming two remarkable newcomers among our directors. Film director and Golden Calf winner Nanouk Leopold is making her theatre debut with Ingmar Bergman’s From the life of the marionettes. Sensational young British director Robert Icke – praised for his version of the Oresteia, which won an Olivier Award – adapts Sophocles’s most famous family tragedy; Oedipus with Hans Kesting in the title role. With Small souls, Ivo van Hove will be finishing the final part of his Couperus trilogy, a coproduction with the Ruhrtriënnale. In total, five years have been spent working on the project. The hidden force and The things that pass will also be performed in Amsterdam. With May we be forgiven, Guy Cassiers will bring the American writer A.M. Homes to the stage for the first time, with a mixed cast of actors from TA and Toneelhuis. The leading role will be played by Eelco Smits. Actor Steven Van Watermeulen will be joining the fixed ensemble.

In the new program series Sign of the Times - a collaboration with De Balie and Stadsschouwburg Amsterdam - theatre, politics and debate will be uniquely combined around one social theme in four evenings. The series will be opened with what is undoubtedly the most important theme in our society today: Identity. Increasingly often, people are addressed based on color, gender, nationality and sexual orientation. They are pinned to something that is unchangeable. A series that gets to the core of the politics of identity.

With Othello, we will be performing in Tokyo for the first time. With Kings of war, we will travel – for the fourth time already – to the Dialog Festival in Poland, Adelaide Festival and Montréal. After the rehearsal / Persona will be performed at Barbican London to finish the TA residency, in Santiago (Chile) and Washington. The year of cancer will go to Milan and we will finally be bringing Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead to New York.

The successful reprises Medea, The year of cancer and The other voice will go on an elaborate tour of the Netherlands and will also be performed in Amsterdam. Kings of war, Ibsen house, Song from Far Away, The maids, The Fountainhead and the complete Couperus trilogy will be performed exclusively in Amsterdam.

The season will close spectacularly with the grand finale of TA’s signature dish Roman tragedies. This extravaganza after Shakespeare, which has been on a triumphant world tour since its premiere at the Holland Festival in 2007, will finish at Koninklijk Theater Carré in June 2018.


Small souls, the final part of Van Hove’s Couperus trilogy

Van Hove: ‘With Small souls, we will complete our triptych based on the works of Louis Couperus. Our ambition was to present Couperus as a contemporary. In 2015, we began with The hidden force, the focal point of which was the never-ending clash of cultures. Couperus ruthlessly describes how eastern and western culture are fundamentally irreconcilable, can’t approach each other further. In 2016, there was The things that pass, a symphony of doom about a family scattered all over the world. We situated it in an immense waiting room where escape is impossible, except through death. It was beautiful how Lot announces a new era at the end. We see this new era in Small souls, the closing piece of the trilogy. We see how a community of sick, tired, extinguished people in a gloomy house gradually find ways to heal. People  who take small steps trying to be happy, trying to live.’

Small souls - with Robert de Hoog, Hans Kesting, Maria Kraakman, Hélène Devos, Chris Nietvelt, Janni Goslinga, Frieda Pittoors and Steven Van Watermeulen, who will be making his debut at TA – will have its world premiere during the Ruhrtriënnale and will be performed exclusively in Amsterdam from October onward. The hidden force and The things that pass will be reprised in Amsterdam next season.


Nanouk Leopold makes her debut as a theatre director

In her films, Nanouk Leopold combines the precise directing of actors with balanced, solid imagery. Her sparing use of dialogue, small amount of plot and the recurring theme of people who, estranged from their own surroundings, observe themselves from a distance, perhaps makes her one of the most prominent directors in the Netherlands who writes her own scenarios and screenplays. For her first theatre directing, she chooses an adaptation of the feature film Aus dem Leben der Marionetten by Ingmar Bergman. In the play, Leopold brings film and theatre together. The production will premiere in Amsterdam in November 2017.

Leopold: ‘I love the characters in Ingmar Bergman’s work. They are almost an abstract translation of what makes people do what they do. The idea that I am allowed to paint my own picture with these characters is very inspiring. Film and theatre maker Ingmar Bergman will serve as a kind of bridge, between me – a film maker – and the stage.’

From the life of the marionettes describes the unhappy marriage of Peter (Eelco Smits) and Katarina Egerman (Janni Goslinga). Everything is seemingly under control in the life of successful businessman Peter, but during a visit to a brothel, he suddenly snaps: he kills and rapes a prostitute. What caused this outburst?


TA introduces talented British director Robert Icke in the Netherlands

Olivier Award winner Robert Icke made his name with sensational adaptations and the directing of various repertory plays. He transformed George Orwell’s novel 1984 – which will be performed on Broadway from June onward - to a contemporary story about a society driven by fear. He rewrote the Oresteia to a courtroom story where the audience was allowed to decide whether Orestes would be acquitted or declared guilty. For this play, he received the Olivier Award for Best Director in 2016. In his Mary Stuart, he lets the two actresses flip a coin at the beginning of every performance in order to determine who will play which queen. He recently directed Hamlet, which will be performed in the West End in a few months’ time.

Icke, who is (only) 30 years old, is regarded as a great young talent in British theatre. At TA, he will be working outside the UK for the first time, adapting the tragedy Oedipus. Icke: ‘Everyone makes mistakes once in a while. Everyone deviates from the plan. But what do we do when our mistakes have been made before? What if our mistakes are the plan? What if those mistakes can no longer be undone? What is our fate? Are we merely the actors in a script that has already been written? By our parents? By the gods? By our own bodies? How can we see through ourselves enough to stop before it is too late? How can we ever know ourselves well enough?’

Oedipus – with Hans Kesting (Oedipus), Hélène Devos (Antigone), Aus Greidanus jr. (Creon), Marieke Heebink (Jocasta), Hugo Koolschijn (Tiresias), Frieda Pittoors (Merope), Bart Slegers, Jip van den Dool and Harm Duco Schut – will have its world premiere in April 2018 and will be performed exclusively in Amsterdam.


Guy Cassiers brings novel by A.M. Homes to the stage

Cassiers: 'During the past years, I worked on performances about political power and rulers with Hamlet vs Hamlet and The kindly ones. With A.M. Homes’s May we be forgiven, I will be staying closer to home and focusing on family and relatives. It has a much lighter tone. Homes’s novel is like a rollercoaster of characters who are losing their grip on reality and their lives. Very American, but perhaps a preview of how human relationships are also evolving here in Europe, either downhill or uphill, that will gradually become clear. May we be forgiven gives an impression of the relational estrangement and emotional confusion of our time, without becoming cynical and even with a surprisingly optimistic ending.’

The adaptation of his great American novel will be Guy Cassiers’s third directing in a coproduction of Toneelgroep Amsterdam and Toneelhuis Antwerp, with actors from both ensembles. With Eelco Smits in the leading role, other actors include Chris Nietvelt, Katelijne Damen, Steven van Watermeulen and Lucas Vandervost. May we be forgiven will have its world premiere in Antwerp in February 2018.

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after the rehearsal / persona

after the rehearsal / persona

Wed 27 Sep 2017 - 19:45
Barbican Centre
Londen
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small souls

small souls

Thu 28 Sep 2017 - 19:30
Maschinenhalle Zweckel
Gladbeck
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after the rehearsal / persona

after the rehearsal / persona

Thu 28 Sep 2017 - 19:45
Barbican Centre
Londen
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This show has been added to your wish list
small souls

small souls

Fri 29 Sep 2017 - 19:30
Maschinenhalle Zweckel
Gladbeck
order
This show has been added to your wish list
after the rehearsal / persona

after the rehearsal / persona

Fri 29 Sep 2017 - 19:45
Barbican Centre
Londen
order
This show has been added to your wish list
small souls

small souls

Sat 30 Sep 2017 - 19:30
Maschinenhalle Zweckel
Gladbeck
order
This show has been added to your wish list
after the rehearsal / persona

after the rehearsal / persona

Sat 30 Sep 2017 - 19:45
Barbican Centre
Londen
order
This show has been added to your wish list